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'Never Forget': Mother's Day Walk For Peace Honors Victims Of Violence

“Never Forget” Steven P. Odom, who was shot dead near his Dorchester home at age 13 in 2007. (Greg Cook)

experiences

Thousands marched down a rainy Dorchester Avenue in this morning’s 17th annual Mother’s Day Walk for Peace, many of them families remembering loved ones murdered in Boston and calling for an end to gun violence in the city. Beginning and ending at Town Field Park in Boston’s Fields Corner neighborhood, they carried signs and wore T-shirts honoring the dead. The event benefits the Louis D. Brown Peace Institute, which provides support to survivors of homicide victims as well being involved in education and policy advocacy efforts.

A woman wearing a shirt remembering Cape Verdean victims, including 3-year-old Malik Andrade Percival, who was fatally shot in Dorchester in 2002, waves a flag calling for “Forgiveness / Peace / Justice.” (Greg Cook)

A woman wearing a shirt remembering Cape Verdean victims, including 3-year-old Malik Andrade Percival, who was fatally shot in Dorchester in 2002, waves a flag calling for “Forgiveness / Peace / Justice.” (Greg Cook)

Remembering “Anita: The Woman with the Golden Heart.” (Greg Cook)

Remembering “Anita: The Woman with the Golden Heart.” (Greg Cook)

“In Loving Memory” of Kelvin Rowell, a 40-year-old who suffered an asthma attack while fleeing shots in Roxbury on Jan. 23, 2012. He fell into a coma for a month and never woke up, dying on March 5. (Greg Cook)

“In Loving Memory” of Kelvin Rowell, a 40-year-old who suffered an asthma attack while fleeing shots in Roxbury on Jan. 23, 2012. He fell into a coma for a month and never woke up, dying on March 5. (Greg Cook)

“Never to be forgotten,” “Clyde” Claude Lee Jones, who died at age 20 in 2003. (Greg Cook)

“Never to be forgotten,” “Clyde” Claude Lee Jones, who died at age 20 in 2003. (Greg Cook)

Remembering Cedirick T. Steele, a Bunker Hill Community College honor student who was shot dead in Roxbury at age 18 in 2007. (Greg Cook)

Remembering Cedirick T. Steele, a Bunker Hill Community College honor student who was shot dead in Roxbury at age 18 in 2007. (Greg Cook)

“Love You Always”: Jorge Fuentes, a 19-year-old fatally shot on the street outside his Dorchester home on Sept. 10, 2012. (Greg Cook)

“Love You Always”: Jorge Fuentes, a 19-year-old fatally shot on the street outside his Dorchester home on Sept. 10, 2012. (Greg Cook)

Remembering Rashid Lesley-Barnes, “Forever Dancing in Our Heart,” a 24-year-old Bostonian who died after being stabbed while getting off a bus in Roxbury on Aug. 15, 2012. (Greg Cook)

Remembering Rashid Lesley-Barnes, “Forever Dancing in Our Heart,” a 24-year-old Bostonian who died after being stabbed while getting off a bus in Roxbury on Aug. 15, 2012. (Greg Cook)

“Never Forget” Steven P. Odom, who was shot dead near his Dorchester home at age 13 in 2007. (Greg Cook)

“Never Forget” Steven P. Odom, who was shot dead near his Dorchester home at age 13 in 2007. (Greg Cook)

Remembering Rodney Almond, a 37-year-old Milton father, was murdered along with another man when the car they were riding in was fired upon in a drive-by shooting in Milton in 2008. (Greg Cook)

Remembering Rodney Almond, a 37-year-old Milton father, was murdered along with another man when the car they were riding in was fired upon in a drive-by shooting in Milton in 2008. (Greg Cook)

“In Memory of Terrance” Jacobs, a 16-year-old stabbed to death by a group of assailants in Dorchester in 2007. (Greg Cook)

“In Memory of Terrance” Jacobs, a 16-year-old stabbed to death by a group of assailants in Dorchester in 2007. (Greg Cook)

Comments

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  • paulagoldman20

    Guns, drugs and revenge nourish the violence. These kids are killing each other or even worse a bullet high up on the spinal cord leaves a person quadraplegic for life. NO cure.

    • http://twitter.com/fufuandoreos OBEHI JANICE

      No cure? Open your heart a little. “These kids” don’t need your spirit of bigotry.

  • paulagoldman20

    There is so far no surgical or medical procedure to repair a spinal cord shattered by bullet or knife. I worked with these young guys (mostly male) and their lives were pretty damn bleak although counseling provided some comfort. Friends and family helped, including those of us who made home medical visits to work on some of the deep wounds, down to the bone. The patient has no feeling when skin and underlying tissue is breaking down due to pressure over bony surfaces.
    Maybe some day in the future spinal cords will be able to be repaired but that may be a long way off. And, by the way, read the news. There are shootings every day that do not kill but a high spinal cord spinal injury is worse than death, in my opinion.
    So Obehi Janice, maybe you could give a little comfort or solace to some of these kids that cannot be medically or surgically cured in 2013. Life is pretty damn lonely for the bedridden. Righto, let’s get rid of drugs, guns and knives. Maybe you are sort of bigoted, think about it before you offer another high handed opinion. Do your part!

  • FrancisMcManus

    Ask Boston Mayoral candidates their plan to end gun violence.

    • paulagoldman20

      What if all of the parents of these (usually young people) removed all guns and knives from the home? I wonder if better parenting of the shooters might help. Perhaps keeping older kids occupied with neighborhood groups/events/sports could prevent joining a gang.

    • paulagoldman20

      Ban and remove all guns outright!

  • paulagoldman20

    By the way Obehi, Perhaps you are more than just a little bigoted yourself.

  • Anonymous

    The people who joined this walk, are the very few select group of people who actually care about their neighborhoods, their children, and their families. As a resident of Roxbury/Dorchester for the past 10 years, I can say for sure that the majority of this neighborhood is comprised of parents/families that do not care about their children and therefore those are the ones who join gangs or become criminals. They are raising a legacy of criminals, because they themselves are criminals, continuing the cycle of crime. I’m surrounded by homes with small children living in them, where it is obvious the adults are selling drugs, having customers come to their homes where their children are around.

    • Madeleine

      Is this person serious? Are they also a drug dealer? Or supplier? I am also a long time resident of Roxbury, and I live here by choice, since I also have a home in one of the most expensive suburbs in Massachussets. I find it to be a community of hard working people who are trying to raise their families the best they can. This idea they are all drug dealers because they happen to be poor is so racist and unoriginal. Perhaps, this person should thank these so called “drug” dealers for keeping Roxbury affordable. With views like theres it is clear they can not afford to live any where else in the city, so they are doing the Roxburians a favor by living amongst them. Really? get over your self this is 2013, did you not get the memo? All communities have their challenges and Roxbury is no exception. It’s only crime perhaps is the concentration of poverty one may find, but isn’t that the real problem? Minorities as drug dealers and criminals is so unoriginal and
      unimaginative. Can we do a little better then that? I love being a resident of Roxbury! If you have a problem with my community then move. You won’t be missed.

  • FrancisMcManus

    Ask Boston Mayoral candidates their plan to end gun violence.